The ICON | The DTILE

  • HERO IMAGE DESIGN Allison Pye Interiors
  • HERO IMAGE PHOTOGRAPHY Jack Shelton
  • WORDS Stephen Crafti
  • est living the icon d tile 02 750x540

    We’re putting the ‘simple but complicated’ DTILE on a pedestal in the second feature of The Icon series.

    Piero Gesualdi, designer and owner of Mondo Piero in Brunswick Street, Fitzroy, has always had a great eye for spotting talent. 

    When he operated his Masons fashion boutiques in Melbourne and Sydney, he was quick to identify the next big thing. Piero still recalls taking his first order from fashion designer Jean Paul Gaultier in the early 1980s and from a kitchen table in Gaultier’s Paris apartment. 

    Although Paris, Milan and London are still on his radar, one of Gesualdi’s most prized discoveries since opening Mondo Piero in 2014 is the DTILE system. From Velp in the Netherlands, these tiles first came to light in 2001 when three designers, Arnout Visser, Erik Jan Kwakkel and Peter van der Jagt, started to experiment and created these sculptural tiles.

    Other designers, such as Philippe Starck and Marc Newson, were also quick to incorporate the DTILE in their projects, appearing in Phillipe Starck’s Ma Cocotte restaurant and Marc Newson’s Qantas first-class lounge in Los Angeles. Those designers closer to home who have ‘caught on’ to DTILE include Australian designers Cox Architecture, architect Scott Weston and Doherty Design Studio.

    est living the icon d tile 19

    DTILES featured in Wilbur’s House kitchen by Allison Pye Interiors with cabinetry by Motto Furniture & Cabinetry | Photography by Jack Shelton

    est living the icon d tile

    Custom coloured DTILES in Aesop Century City, Santa Monica Boulevard | Photography courtesy of Aesop

    est living the icon d tile 02

    Custom coloured DTILES in Aesop Century City, Santa Monica Boulevard | Photography courtesy of Aesop

    Available in 20 different shades from white through to blackish brown, and every shade in between, DTILES have become icons of the design world in less than 20 years. And rather than creating tiles simply for walls or for floors, the DTILE can be transformed into curvaceous basins, showers, benches, stools and literally every possible configuration imaginable. 

    Accessories that form part of the system, including handles, soap dishes and toilet roll handles, add to the joy of using the DTILE. “It’s taken the art of tiling to a whole new level. They recall the modernist bathrooms from the 1930s and ‘40s. You could say that it’s a paradigm shift in tiling,” Piero says. 

    est living the icon d tile 11

    Greenwich Peninsula by Tom Dixon’s Design Research Studio | Photography courtesy of Tom Dixon

     “It’s taken the art of tiling to a whole new level. They recall the modernist bathrooms from the 1930s and ‘40s. You could say that it’s a paradigm shift in tiling.”

     

    Piero Gesualdi, designer and owner of Mondo Piero

    est living the icon d tile 03

    Kia Ora by Baracco + Wright | Photography by Rory Gardiner

    est living the icon d tile 04

    The DTILE Cup Tile shown in Sage House by Carole Whiting | Photography by Jack Shelton

    When this writer recently renovated his home with architect Robert Simeoni, there was never any discussion about not using the DTILE system for two bathrooms, including a guest powder room. After seeing the DTILE display set up at Mondo Piero, it seemed the most appropriate solution, particularly given the home in which they would go was designed in the mid-1930s. 

    “I loved the blackish-brown hues of the tiles selected, as well as them being evocative of the art deco period,” says Robert Simeoni. Architect Scott Weston has used these tiles in a grey-mauve hue for his kitchen and Baracco & Wright Architects couldn’t resist using them for an art deco streamlined modernist apartment. “These tiles have a timeless quality. They could have been produced now, or back in the 1930s; nicely ambiguous,” adds Robert. “They have a feeling of weight, a history that beckons you to almost design a space to accommodate them,” he adds. 

    Iconic is a significant term to attribute to something relatively new, whether it’s a chair, a table or in this case a ceramic tile that appears to do ‘gymnastics’. “Many iconic designs borrow from the past. But as with the DTILE, it’s been taken forward and looks as contemporary in a 1930s home as it does in a swank new bar or restaurant,” Piero adds.  

    est living the icon d tile 10

    The home of Stephen Crafti | Photography by Derek Swalwell

    est living the icon d tile 14

    Ensuite Bathroom by Utkan Gunerkan | Photography courtesy of Utkan Gunerkan

    est living the icon d tile 05

    Screen House by Studio Ben Allen | Photography by Henrietta Williams

    est living the icon d tile 12

    The VIPP Pedal Bin and the DTILE Cup Tile in the DTILE WC by Akme | Photography courtesy of Akme

    est living the icon d tile 13

    DTILE WC by Akme | Photography courtesy of Akme

    est living the icon d tile 06 750x1000

    OfficeP by Emil Dervish | Photography courtesy of Emil Dervish

  • the look

2 comments on “The ICON | The DTILE

  1. Hi Antonia!

    The official Melbourne stockist for the DTILE is Mondo Piero.

    Thanks,

    The est team

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

THE LOOK